The Tombstone Pterodactyl and Vintage Cryptids…

In the wild, weird west as well as in the present day, folks saw and reported strange beasties, such as the “Thunderbird” supposedly pictured here, reported by the Tombstone Epitaph in April 1890 which had reportedly been terrorizing Native American and local populations for some time. So a couple of good ole cowboys shot the sucker down, and are proudly posing with the carcass in the picture above, its wings extended to give you an idea of the critter’s size. It resembles a pterodactyl, which some contend never had become fully extinct, and which may upon rare occasion be seen from time to time

Trouble is, the newspaper in question lacked the capability of producing photos at that time, and the original of the photographic evidence has never been located. It is accordingly widely thought to be a vintage fake. Similar photos also exist of Civil War soldiers who supposedly also shot down a pterosaur or two.

So why, then, do such photos exist? The answer is simply that such stories sell newspapers, even if unaccompanied by a photo. They were simply meeting a public demand for the sensational while increasing their own profit margin. People tended to be a bit more gullible in the 1890’s, although there’s still no shortage of such folks today.

Now, I would dearly love to see Rodan grace the skies, but until we have scientific proof of the existence of such cryptids, we need to be skeptical of any and all such claims. If nothing else, they were entertaining then as now…and we want to believe!

Explore posts in the same categories: anomalies, avian, controversial, cryptozoology, extinct species, furry, historical perspectives, legends and folklore, paranormal, prehistoric life, Vintage, weird

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4 Comments on “The Tombstone Pterodactyl and Vintage Cryptids…”

  1. carycomic Says:

    Sadly, I believe the last truly relict specimen of pteranodon (the legit name for the crested pterasaurs) had its neck broken by some Wild West Show matador in turn-of-the-20th century Mexico. At a place called “El Valle de Gwangi!”

    I could be wrong. But, I think that’s somewhere in the Monte Hueco region. ..which is controversially famous for purple allosaurus sightings.

    πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person


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